Saturday, October 19, 2013

Exit Slip, Exit Ticket, Ticket out the Door

No matter what you call it, the exit slip is a super, quick, little assessment.

I had to come up with a plan for how to administer and check the exit slips in my science classes.

So, I designed a bulletin board to house the materials. I'm actually not finished. It seems that everything I do needs some revision.  I always come up with a new idea and have to change things. OK...I don't have to change things, but my compulsive personality makes me do it!





Currently, I pass out the slips and the students place them in the red folders.  Each student will be responsible for some meta-cognitive thinking.  Do they know what they know?  The 4,3,2,1 folders would assume that they do.  






After answering two questions that appear on the smart board at the conclusion of a lesson, each student will place his/her exit slip into the appropriate folder. I love looking on as they place their slips. It's really a quick way to evaluate my lesson.  Did most students understand the concepts?
Or I should ask, did they think they understood the concepts? If there is a large portion of the students putting their slips into the "1" or "2" folder, I'm in trouble. That's a sure indicator that it's time for me to design a new lesson and present the material again. If it's early on in a unit, I try not to get too excited over a lot of 1 and 2 responses.  We will be working on the same skills and concepts for many days to follow.  At the end of a unit, the 1 and 2 responses are somewhat alarming.

That being said, it has been a very enlightening experience to evaluate the exit slips.  Only two students in my first period class missed both questions.  Twelve of the students missed one question and eight of the students answered both questions correctly. This does set the tone for my next lesson. Enough of the students missed at least one question that I feel a review lesson is warranted.

As far as the display is concerned, I am going to add another folder to hold the blank exit slips. The procedure for students will be to grab a slip on the way to your seat at the beginning of class.  Then, I don't have to waste time passing out fresh slips each period. The students can just pull them out when I display the questions on the smart board. Currently, I have a folder on my computer with exit slip questions that I can pull up quickly and save for next year.





Cheers!







31 comments:

  1. I LOVE the idea of your exit slips! How did you hang the folders? It looks like you have them hanging on a closet door. Have you had any problems with the kids knocking them loose?

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  2. Thanks! Our classrooms all have cork board cabinets. I used laminated file folders and attached with staples. They do, on occasion, come loose and I have to re-staple. I'm going to purchase some of the more sturdy pockets from Staples for next year. They are from the Martha Stewart with Avery collection. A bit pricey, but a really nice product (see My Teacher Space post). I can get them one at a time with a coupon that's found at the back of the weekly flyer. If you don't have cork, attach the folders with Command Strips...I LOVE those! They remove really easily. I used them to hang heavy, laminated posters on my windows. (see Back to School post). The windows become moist and hot with the afternoon sun. The strips hold tight and don't melt or dry up like other tape usually does.
    Hope this helps...
    Cheers!

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  3. This is SUCH a great idea! I've been looking around at ways that I can put up exit slips. I love this way of organizing!

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  4. Thanks Amy. We have a long, 4-day weekend coming up. My goal is to organize something similar for guided reading groups.

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  5. Do the kids write anything on the slips? Is this where they answer the 2 questions? Do they put their names on the slips or is this an anonymous way to evaluate them?

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    1. Hi Janae,
      The questions are displayed up on the smart board at the end of class. Each student writes his/her answers on the slip. Yes, they put their names on the slips. I often pull a small group the next day to go over the questions if any of the students had trouble. I don't record grades. The slips are used only as a quick, formative assessment. I hope this helps...cheers!

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  7. Love this idea! I have high schoolers though...do you have any issues with your students not wanting to be the one who doesn't get it?

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    1. Hi Aubrie,
      I don't have any issues with that right now. The kids are more than willing to tell me that they "don't get it". Although, some students place their answers in the "Got It" folder, when in fact they didn't get it at all. This only happened a few times and I imagine it's because sometimes I pull a small group to differentiate the instruction. Some students may not want to be in the "don't get it group". But, overall, most students are honest. Luckily, the majority of students do show some understanding. I hope this helps.

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  8. I love this idea--especially for upper grade levels, and it can easily be done if I forget.

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    1. Thanks M-town Lady!
      The students really enjoy it. I've had to make some adjustments along the way. Like, I dismiss one group at a time. Too many kids at the folders at once is disastrous!

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  9. Do you have a set for each class? Or do you empty them between each period?

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    1. Hi Allison,
      I do empty the folders after each class. I quickly look at the slips and pull the ones that need some attention. Truthfully, I throw the other ones in the trash. We have so much data to record, I don't feel the need to record this quick, formative assessment. I get together with the target students by the end of the day, or early the next morning. Often we go over the exit slips together and correct mistakes or I implement a different teaching strategy and then, give the students the exit slip to try again.

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  10. Great idea! Going to start setting this up asap in my classroom.

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  11. I'm planning to do a variation on this Wednesday with my college chemistry lab. Thanks for the idea of using folders!

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  12. Just curious what your exit slip looks like. Do you have a generic exit slip ready to go or do you print individual ones for everyday?

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    1. I think they are generic because the actual questions are posted with the smart board.

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  13. It is quite alright to be compulsive.

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  14. What kinds of questions do you ask? Are they more for reflection or for recall?

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  15. What kinds of questions do you ask? Are they more for reflection or for recall?

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    1. Hi Christine,
      I'm sorry that it took so long to get back to you. I'm in the process of creating a new blog. I ask a variety of types of questions. They all center around the skill that we learned that day. I usually try to give between 1-5 questions depending upon length. It should take only 5-10 minutes for students to complete an exit slip.
      Hope this helps. Cheers!

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  16. I would just love to shake your hand because this is an amazing idea! I start working as first-year teacher this Friday and I'm going to implement this pronto!

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    1. Thank you so much, Yoshua. You made my day. I am in the process of creating a new blog site. Please look me up again. Cheers!

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  17. I have a question! Did you buy the folders laminated? or did you get them laminated? New teacher and this looks like an excellent idea! Do you use these folders for other work as well? I am a K-3 Special Education Teacher :)

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    1. Hi,
      I laminated these folders my self through our local BOCES. I keep these folders stationary strictly for exit slip use. We use similar folders for "Friday folders". I'm starting a new blog soon to encompass the crafts that I create, as well as, classroom related topics. Friday folders will be my first classroom post. Look me up under the same name. Cheers!

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  18. Just wondering what kind of questions you use?

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  19. are you willing to provide your list of questions? :)

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    1. Hi Jordyne,
      I use a variety of questions depending upon the lesson. I teach 5th grade math and science. But, I love to throw reading and writing into the mix.
      I usually "recreate" a question from the material that we used to learn a specific daily skill. I give 1-5 questions depending upon the content. An exit slip should not take more than 5-10 minutes to wrap up a lesson. Look for my Friday folder post on my new, updated blog...coming soon!

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  20. I love this idea! Would change "Nope" to "Not Yet", promoting a "Growth Mindset". Can't wait to make one for my classroom.

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  21. I love the idea, but I feel that it could be embarrassing for some students to put their paper in a folder showing they didn't get it. It does save time for the teacher, but I'm thinking if they write the corresponding number on the top right corner, place in one folder, it would be quick to pull out the low numbers. Just a thought! Love the idea, thanks!

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    1. Hi xandylouwho,
      Thank you for your comment and your idea. This is an older post and I no longer use this bulletin board in my classroom. My mastery management system is ever evolving.
      Take care...
      Shannon

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